Destination
Detailed Restriction/Reopening Information For United Arab Emirates
Data Last Updated: October 04, 2020

General Information

Partially Open

Effective August 1, 2020, all citizens, residents, tourists, and transit passengers are required to obtain a negative COVID-19 certificate before arriving into Dubai (DXB) airport. The test must be taken a maximum of 96 hours prior to departure.

Another test will be administered for passengers entering Dubai/U.A.E. via Dubai (DXB) airport and they are advised to quarantine until the test result is available (usually in less than 24 hours).

To enter the emirate/city of Abu Dhabi, another PCR test and mandatory 14 day quarantine period must be undertaken. Passengers departing Dubai (DXB) airport, must also present a PCR test prior to departure as per Emirates airlines.

On September 24, the UAE authorities have started allowing tourists to visit Abu Dhabi and the northern emirates. Each of the emirates has different policies for inbound and outbound passengers.

Arrivals into Abu Dhabi will be required to undergo a PCR test and will be given a tracking wristband that they must wear for their entire 14-day quarantine.  A second PCR test must be taken on their 12th day of quarantine. When the test result is negative, they can return the wristband to finish isolation.

Mask Requirement

Mask is required to be worn in all public indoor, public transport and certain outdoor areas where social distancing is not possible.

Internal Restrictions/Closures

Movement restrictions within Dubai have eased. However, to enter Abu Dhabi, individuals must  present a COVID test conducted in the last 48 hours from an approved facility or schedule an appointment for a laser blood test. These regulations may change.

Social-distancing guidelines, requiring people to keep a two-metre distance from others outside homes, must be followed at all times, and masks remain mandatory outdoors. 

Restaurants and bars are open under capacity and social distancing limitations and all non-essential businesses and attractions have re-opened.

The UAE Attorney General announced that individuals failing to follow rules and regulations to curb the spread of COVID-19 will face additional fines varying from 1000-100,000 Emirati dirhams. 

Wearing masks in the UAE is mandatory for all in public places, public transportation or commercial centers, when walking outside in high-density public areas and in private transportation.

Airlines & Transport

All passengers arriving in Dubai from any destination, including passengers connecting in Dubai, must have a negative COVID-19 PCR test certificate to be accepted on the flight. We recommend you bring a printed certificate, but digital ones are accepted in Dubai. It must be an official certificate - SMS confirmation messages are not accepted. The test must be taken a maximum of 96 hours before departure. This excludes children under the age of 12 and passengers who have a moderate or severe disability.

Emirates Airlines Information

Emirates Airlines is flying from 40 countries to Dubai and is actively looking to expand these routes as demand increases over the next few weeks.

Status of Opening to Tourists

Information based on tourists place of residence being in that country for the last 14 days

Select Country of Residence
Test Required For Tourists From:

243 Countries

Afghanistan

Albania

Algeria

American Samoa

Andorra

Angola

Anguilla

Antarctica

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Aruba

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Belarus

Belgium

Belize

Benin

Bermuda

Bhutan

Bolivia

Bonaire

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Botswana

Brazil

British Virgin Islands

Brunei

Bulgaria

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Cape Verde

Cayman Islands

Central African Republic

Chad

Chile

China

Christmas Island

Cocos Islands

Colombia

Comoros

Cook Islands

Costa Rica

Croatia

Cuba

Curaçao

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Democratic Republic of Congo

Denmark

Djibouti

Dominica

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

Egypt

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Falkland Islands

Faroe Islands

Fiji

Finland

France

French Guiana

French Polynesia

Gabon

Gambia

Georgia

Germany

Ghana

Gibraltar

Greece

Greenland

Grenada

Guadeloupe

Guam

Guatemala

Guernsey

Guinea

Guinea-Bissau

Guyana

Haiti

Honduras

Hong Kong

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran

Iraq

Ireland

Isle of Man

Israel

Italy

Ivory Coast

Jamaica

Japan

Jersey

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Kosovo

Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan

Laos

Latvia

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Macao

Macedonia

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Maldives

Mali

Malta

Marshall Islands

Martinique

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mayotte

Mexico

Micronesia

Moldova

Monaco

Mongolia

Montenegro

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Morocco

Mozambique

Myanmar

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Netherlands

New Caledonia

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

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North Korea

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Norway

Oman

Pakistan

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Panama

Papua New Guinea

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Peru

Philippines

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Poland

Portugal

Puerto Rico

Qatar

Republic of Congo

Réunion

Romania

Russia

Rwanda

Saint Barthélemy

Saint Helena

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Martin

Saint Pierre and Miquelon

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa

San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Serbia

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Singapore

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Slovakia

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Solomon Islands

Somalia

South Africa

South Georgia

South Korea

South Sudan

Spain

Sri Lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Svalbard and Jan Mayen

Sweden

Switzerland

Syria

Taiwan

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Tanzania

Thailand

Timor-Leste

Togo

Tokelau

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia

Turkey

Turkmenistan

Turks and Caicos

Tuvalu

U.S. Virgin Islands

Uganda

Ukraine

United Kingdom

United States

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Vatican City

Venezuela

Vietnam

Wallis and Futuna

Western Sahara

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

More Details

Last Updated: October 28, 2020

After several months of closing its borders to curb the spread of Covid-19, Dubai has reopened to tourists once again. Known for its glitzy skyscrapers, balmy beaches, and high-end malls, Dubai is one of the first cities in the Middle East to restart tourism. However, the local government has imposed several travel restrictions for tourists to follow before flying.

Dubai Is the Only City that Has Opened in the UAE

Dubai is part of the United Arab Emirates (UAE). Notably, Abu Dhabi, the UAE’s capital city, is still closed for visitors. Even UAE residents are not yet allowed to enter the capital city unless they provide a negative Covid-19 test result. As of now, Dubai is the only emirate that has opened for tourism.

So if you are planning to visit the grandiose Sheikh Zayed Mosque or the lavish Louvre Museum on your visit to the UAE, you may have to wait a little longer. Abu Dhabi remains closed to the rest of the UAE, and the local government has imposed movement restrictions on its residents.

New Protocols For Tourists Visiting Dubai

As with any country that has opened its doors in a post-COVID-19 world, Dubai has imposed new tourist protocols to prevent the spread of COVID-19 and protect its visitors and residents. Here are a few requirements for tourists when visiting the desert city.

  • Each visitor must have health insurance to cover the medical costs, in case they get sick or infected with the Covid-19 virus. This must be presented upon arrival.
  • Tourists are required to download an app for Covid-19 contact tracing. They must register their details into the app.
  • A health declaration form must be submitted before flying into Dubai.
  • All tourists are required to undergo a coronavirus test within four days (96 hours) of departure. Anyone who cannot provide this test will be asked to undergo a test at the airport.
  • Those who will test positive on the Covid-19 test conducted at the airport will be taken to a government facility for 14-day isolation. They will have to shoulder the cost of the quarantine. If the test turned out negative, then there’s no longer a need to isolate, and the tourist can freely enter Dubai for a holiday.

Latest update: Authorities in Dubai have changed the COVID‑19 PCR test requirements for some arriving passengers. Starting October 26, tourists coming from the UK and Germany will have the option to take a COVID‑19 PCR test on arrival. They have also required some travelers that came from certain destinations to undergo a mandatory two-test rule.

What’s Open In Dubai?

Tourism plays a key role in the growth of Dubai's economy. Last year, the glittering commercial capital has welcomed 16.7 million international visitors. In an effort to revive its tourism economy, Dubai has launched several marketing campaigns. The local government has urged tourist attractions to resume operations, with hotels now catering to international guests and offering huge discounts. Museums have opened up and desert adventures have also resumed.

Although there are a few restrictions in place, such as reduced capacity and social distancing rules, generally, Dubai has returned as a tourist destination. Beaches are also opened and waterparks have resumed operations with a strict set of safety guidelines in place.

Latest Update - On September 24, the UAE authorities have started allowing tourists to visit Abu Dhabi and the northern emirates. Each of the emirates has different policies for inbound and outbound passengers. Arrivals into Abu Dhabi will be required to undergo a PCR test and will be given a tracking wristband that they must wear for their entire 14-day quarantine. A second PCR test must be taken on their 12th day of quarantine. When the test result is negative, they can return the wristband to finish isolation.

See the detailed restrictions and live report for the UAE here.


See the full blog post & comments

Information for Non-Tourists

Residents holding Dubai-issued visas are permitted to return to the emirate by pre-booking flights on any airline on the condition that they obtain an approval coordinated between the General Directorate of Residency and Foreigners Affairs (GDRFA Dubai) and the airline. 

Residents must fill a ‘Health Declaration Form’ before embarking on their journey to confirm they do not have COVID-19 symptoms. The airline has the right to refuse boarding if passengers display any symptoms of COVID-19.

Starting October 5, citizens arriving in Dubai are no longer required to take a PCR test for the coronavirus before leaving the place they are coming from and are only required to take the test on arrival in Dubai.

131,508

Cases

490

Deaths

13,244

Cases Per Million
Recovering From COVID-19

Graph of COVID-19 Cases In Last 30 Days
For United Arab Emirates

DISCLAIMER: Always do your own research prior to booking travel. Learn More Here